Tuesday, December 15, 2009

Happy Hanukkah



Last Friday began the celebration of Hanukkah, so we're 5 days in at this point.   This is not a Christian holiday, and not one of extreme significance to Jews - but it does give them an opportunity of celebration during the season of Advent/Christmass for Christians and has thus gained in popularity in recent generations.  I felt it may be interesting and even helpful to share some of the meanings and traditions the Jews celebrate during this season.

 
What Is Hanukkah?
Hanukkah (or Chanukah, Hanukah, Hannuka or the Festival of Lights) is the celebration of the Jewish victory over the Syrians in 165 BC and the rededication of the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem.  Jews now celebrate this holiday throughout the world with 8 days of merriment.  In 168 BC the Temple was seized and dedicated to the worship of Zeus.
 
Judah Maccabee and his soldiers went to the holy Temple, and were saddened that many things were missing or broken, including the golden menorah. They cleaned and repaired the Temple, and when they were finished, they decided to have a big dedication ceremony. For the celebration, the Maccabees wanted to light the menorah. They looked everywhere for oil, and found a small flask that contained only enough oil to light the menorah for one day. Miraculously, the oil lasted for eight days. This gave them enough time to obtain new oil to keep the menorah lit. Today Jews celebrate Hanukkah for eight days by lighting candles in a menorah every night, thus commemorating the eight-day miracle.  (Source).
 

Significance of Hanukkah

According to Jewish law, Hanukkah is one of the less important Jewish holidays. However, Hanukkah has become much more popular in modern practice because of its proximity to Christmas.
Hanukkah falls on the twenty-fifth day of the Jewish month of Kislev. Since the Jewish calendar is lunar based, every year the first day of Hanukkah falls on a different day – usually sometime between late November and late December. Because many Jews live in predominately Christian societies, over time Hanukkah has become much more festive and Christmas-like. Jewish children receive gifts for Hanukkah – often one gift for each of the eight nights of the holiday. Many parents hope that by making Hanukkah extra special their children won't feel left out of all the Christmas festivities going on around them. (Source).
 

Hanukkah Traditions

Every community has its unique Hanukkah traditions, but there are some traditions that are almost universally practiced. They are: lighting the hanukkiyah, spinning the dreidel and eating fried foods.
  • Lighting the hanukkiyah: Every year it is customary to commemorate the miracle of the Hanukkah oil by lighting candles on a hanukkiyah. The hanukkiyah is lit every night for eight nights. Learn more about the hanukkiyah in the article, What Is a Hanukkiyah?
  • Spinning the dreidel: A popular Hanukkah game is spinning the dreidel, which is a four-sided top with Hebrew letters written on each side. Read The Hanukkah Dreidel to learn more about the dreidel, the meaning of the letters and how to play the game. Gelt, which are chocolate coins covered with tin foil, are part of this game.
  • Eating fried foods: Because Hanukkah celebrates the miracle of oil, it is traditional to eat fried foods such as latkes and sufganiyot during the holiday. Latkes are pancakes made out of potatoes and onions, which are fried in oil and then served with applesauce. Sufganiyot (singular: sufganiyah) are jelly-filled donuts that are fried and sometimes dusted with confectioners’ sugar before eating.
(Source).



2 comments:

  1. Actually, when I posted that it was still the 4th Day of Hanukkah, but by the time most read this, it will be the 5th day (or later).

    ReplyDelete
  2. Wish you a Merry Christmas and May this festival bring abundant joy and happiness in your life! Great Religion Magazine collection I like to share with all Christian brothers and sisters.

    ReplyDelete

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